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Dolomite Sprint

dolomite_sprintArguably the best model to come from British Leyland is the Triumph Dolomite Sprint. The Sprint was a true sports saloon and offered incredible performance that is impressive even by today's standards. A unique 16 valve SOHC head was applied to this model, which was favourably comapred with BMW2002tii and similar sporting saloons of the period.

Australian market cars were all Mimosa (yellow), but dealers like Hodgson in Sydney,specially imported a few white ones to offer something a lttle special to enthusiasts. Anumber of the cars were raced here , however they had few major sucesses.

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GT6 Mk1

Written by Cindy O'Beirne

The GT6 owes its heritage to the four 1964 Le Mans Spitfires. These Spitfires were very successful competition cars aimed at winning their class and giving a bit of stick to MG! Producing 102 BHP at 7,000 RPM, these remarkable cars conquered the 24 hour race reaching top speeds of 134 MPH. David Hobbs and Rob Slotemaker bought in ADU2B in 21st Place overall and 3rd in class averaging 94.7MPH for the whole 24 hours. Unfortunately ADU1B and ADU3B retired after being involved in accidents and not because of mechanical problems and after having been leading their class. ADU 4B didn’t race but was kept as a spare.

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GT6 Mk2

Written by Cindy O'Beirne

The sales success of the GT6 Mk1 spurred Triumph into fixing the rear suspension problems and updating the car to meet U.S. safety standards. 80% of the cars were being exported and despite the rear suspension problems, the car was more popular than the MGB GT. The Mk2 provided a complete car. Once again, Harry Webster wanted the car to be further inspired by competition so in 1966, a six cylinder version of the Le Mans Spitfire was built. Triumph’s project manager, Ray Henderson built a car that produced 200BHP and had a top speed in excess of 150MPH. But at this point in time, the GT6 hadn’t been homologated and would therefore have to compete in the prototype category against the Ford GT’s, Ferraris and Porsches. What a pity as Webster decided to withdraw from the event. The prototype was called the GT6 R and its survival is unknown and is doubtful.

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GT6 Mk3

Written by Adrian Diehm

The final version of the GT6 was produced between 1970 and 1973 with 13,042 units built. It had a mid-life upgrade with a conversion to using the Spitfire MkIV suspension being introduced. In the U.S. the familiar problem of less power again hurt performance. The compression ratio was reduced from 9.5:1 of the Mk 1, to 9.25:1 in the Mk 2 and 8:1 in the Mk 3 with a result that only 90BHP was produced in early models (1971) and an even lower result of 79BHP (1972-73). Home market cars continued to enjoy 104BHP.

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Herald 1200

Written by Adrian Diehm

The Herald 1200 was the first major upgrade of the Herald range, giving it a capacity increase from 948cc to 1147cc, and the option of disc brakes on the front.

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Mk1 Sedan - 2000

Written by Adrian Diehm

The first  variant of the Triumph 2000 / 2500 series made its debut in 1964

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Mk1 Sedan - PI

Written by Adrian Diehm

This rare model was released in Australia in mid 1968, as the up-market version of the highly sucessful 2000 model. The PI models shared an identical Australian-made body with the 2000 model of the same year , but featured the 2500 engine like in the TR5 (but with softer camshaft), rostyle wheel trims, radial tyres, larger exhaust pipes, stiffer springs and shockies, 140mph speedo , deeply sculpured seats. Discreet "injection" badges were added to the chrome boonet mould and on the rear panel, whilst the C pillars got small round "PI" (petrol injection) badges.

Unfortunately, overdrive was not offered as an option here, and many of them used the BW35 auto transmission as they were sold as "up-market" or luxury cars. 

 
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Mk2 Sedan - 2000

Written by Adrian Diehm

This model was released in Australia in 1970 , along with the Mk2 PI, as the replacement for the Mk1 model. The 2000 models shared an identical body with the PI model , but featured chrome bezels on the instruments, and a 3-person rear seat. Most of them were manuals. The engine used a GT6 spec camshaft and a pair of 1.5" SU or Stromberg carburettors, depending on the year.

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Mk2 Sedan - 2500 S

Written by Adrian Diehm

Triumph2500sThe last variant of the Triumph 2000 / 2500 series made its debut in 1975, the range topping 2500S. The 2500S effectively replaced the 2500TC and the earlier 2.5 PI, using twin carbs, All 2500S come fitted with factory allow wheels and optional Air Conditioning

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Mk2 Sedan - 2500 TC

Written by Adrian Diehm

This model was released in Australia in 1972 to counter the poor reputation of the PI model. Bascially, a down-spec MK2 PI, it had slightly different trim design, no tacho and a 2-spoke steering wheel. The engine used a GT6 spec camshaft and a pair of 1.5" SU or Stromberg carburettors, depening on the year. The last 2500 TC was sold in Australia in 1978, and it varied very little from the 1972 version.

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Mk2 Sedan - PI

Written by Adrian Diehm

The up-market variant of the Triumph 2000 series made its debut in 1970. Features that separated it from the Mk2 2000, included black-bezelled instuments which included a tacho, 3-spoke steering wheel, heavily sculpured rear seat made for 2 persons, black vinyl trim on the C pillars and boot panel between the lights, black grille.

The entire mechanicals were carried over from the Mk1 PI, with negligible changes.

 

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Spitfire Mk4

Written by Adrian Diehm

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Spitfire 1500

Written by Adrian Diehm

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Spitfire Mk2

Written by Adrian Diehm

 

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Spitfire Mk3

Written by Adrian Diehm

 

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STAG

Written by Adrian Diehm

triumph_stagThe Stag was released in September 1970. The body was designed by Micholetti and powered by its own unique Triumph designed 3000cc SOHC V8 that produced 145bhp. All Stags came with a removeable hardtop and foldaway soft top. The Stag V8 convertible was astounding value for money, less than half the cost of its rivals. 

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TR 2

Written by Adrian Diehm

tr2

This is the first full production TR made

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TR3

Written by Adrian Diehm

The TR3 replaced the TR2 in October 1955. Over its lifetime it was uprated to TR3A (1957), the first British car to adopt front disc brakes. Its engine was rated at 100bhp at 5000rpm. A model designated as TR3B was built specifically for the US market.

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TR3 A

Written by Adrian Diehm
tr3a

The TR3A is fitted with a larger 2138cc engine than the its predecessor the TR3 which had a 1991cc engine

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TR4

Written by Adrian Diehm

The TR4 with a dramatically new shape styled by Michelotti, was released in 1961. Its engine is slightly larger than the tr3 at 2138cc, but was still rated at 100bhp at 4700rpm. In 1965, the TR4A was introduced with its main feature being independent rear suspension and engine output of 104bhp. 

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TR4 A

Written by Adrian Diehm

tr4The main difference betwen the TR4 and TR4A was the inclusion of Indipendant Rear Suspension (IRS). The IRS design used in the TR4A was the basis for the IRS used in TR5, TR6, Sedans and Stag

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TR5

Written by Adrian Diehm

tr5The TR5 was launched in October 1967, with a 2498cc 6 cylinder fuel injected engine producing 150bhp. This model remained current for only 15 months and only about 2600 were sold. A rare item indeed.  This model is not to be confused with the more numerous TR250, which was a US only market car, with twin carburettors, softer camshaft and lower compression head. A number of imported cars have been converted and occassionally get passed off as genuine TR5's

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TR6

Written by Adrian Diehm
tr6

Some people say the TR6 was the end of the true TR sports car. It had the best of everything the TR range had to offer, Disk Brakes, IRS, Electric Overdrive and a soft top

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TR7

The TR7 was a very controversial shape to say the least. None of the original TR heritage was carried over to this car, it was a completly new car from the groud up. Mechanically this car was musch the same as most of the Japenese offerings of the time.

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TR8

tr7Triumph brings you the most powerful TR ever as performance returns to the open sports car. The TR8 convertable, Triumphs newest source of power.

The heart of the TR8 is a muscular 3.5 litre V8 cast of light weight aluminum alloy, Strong silent pulsing V8 power! Dual exhausts, fuel injection and cylinders lined with high strength steel give it impressive power and strength.

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Vitesse

Written by Adrian Diehm

The Triumph Vitesse is a compact six-cylinder car built by Standard-Triumph from May 1962 to July 1971. The car was styled by Giovanni Michelotti, and was available in saloon and convertible variants.

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